Home >> build IT Donates 3D Printed Face Shields

Over the past three weeks, the 3D printers from build IT makerspace have been hard at work manufacturing face shields.

 
The NIH 3D Print Exchange, in response to COVID-19, hosts a collection of personal protective equipment (PPE) 3D models that represents a coordinated effort among the FDA, VA, and America Makes to connect healthcare providers and 3D printing organizations.
 
Based on the limitation of print duration and print area dimensions, I selected the IC3D Budmen Face Shield. This design has undergone review in a clinical setting and is recommended when fabricated as instructed. It takes 3.5 hours to manufacture one face shield. 
 
While the 3D printer can manufacture the face shield structure, it still requires additional material to be a functioning PPE. For each face, I needed an 18" elastic band, 9" foam pad, and a 9x12" plastic sheet. Purchasing this material turned out to be the most challenging step. Due to all the makers' fantastic response to COVID-19, much of the material was sold out. Fortunately, I was able to find what I needed, but I had to pay for overnight shipping to get in as soon as possible. 
 
As the face shields were being produced, I started researching how to donate them. Luckily, Rady Children's Hospital Foundation launched its COVID-19 Medical Equipment Initiative, a partnership with the County of San Diego and the Rock Church, to streamline the community's generosity to ensure the needs of the frontline care provider are addressed during the coronavirus pandemic. Through the COVID-19 Medical Equipment Initiative, representatives will collect, track, and distribute donated critical-need medical equipment across institutions as determined by daily census and inventory assessments.
 
Finally, on April 14th, 51 face shields were donated to the Rady Children's Hospital Foundation in the name of build IT makerspace @SDSU Library. Face shields continue to be produced with hopes of an additional donation soon. 
 
See the 3D printer in action, in this 11 second video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/qUGfs7sGfuE
 
By Jenny Wong-Welch, STEM Librarian