Black History Month 2020

 

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Home >> Research & Instruction >> Research Services Blog >> Black History Month 2020

San Diego State University Library
Celebrates Black History Month

2020 – African Americans and the Vote
Black History Month honors the impact African Americans have made on U.S. history

Watch a Movie, Read, Listen to Music!

The Origin

Carter G. Woodson, a noted African American historian, scholar, teacher, and publisher, established Negro History Week in 1926, which evolved into Black History Month following the Black Consciousness Movement of the 1960s. Woodson sought to help African Americans rediscover a history that had been intentionally buried by white mainstream culture.

A second goal in developing Negro History Week was to foster understanding between the races. Woodson believed that if whites learned of blacks’ contributions to American history and humanity, this awareness would engender respect.

The year 2020 marks the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment and the culmination of the women’s suffrage movement. The year 2020 also marks the sesquicentennial of the Fifteenth Amendment (1870) and the right of black men to the ballot after the Civil War. The theme speaks, therefore, to the ongoing struggle on the part of both black men and black women for the right to vote.

For more information on the Black History Month Theme, please visit www.asalh.org

For further information about African Americans and the vote, check out the lists of resources listed below and come by the library to enjoy a book, read an article, check out DVDs, and CDs. You can also access many of these documentaries and music free through streaming services provided to you by you (your student fees helped secure licensing):

In addition to the sources listed below, check out the library holdings at library.sdsu.edu


Databases: A Selected List

Academic Video Online (AVON)

New - AVON delivers more than 68,000 titles spanning anthropology, business, counseling, film, health, history, music, and more. SDSU has full access to all AVON titles.

Alexander Street Press Streaming Media and E-Scores

Includes streaming access to music and video collections. For a complete list of collections to which the library subscribes, click on "My Collections."

Black Studies Center

Black Studies Center contains The Schomburg Studies on the Black Experience, Index to Black Periodicals Full Text, Black Literature Index, and the Chicago Defender historical newspaper from 1912-1975, as well as The HistoryMakers® oral history video resource with extensive interviews with 100 contemporary African Americans and eight additional historical black newspapers.

Ethnic NewsWatch

Newspaper, magazine and journal articles from ethnic, minority and native presses.

Race Relations in America (1943-1970)

New - Race Relations in America is a collection of documents produced by the American Missionary Association's Race Relations Department between 1943 and 1970 to investigate problem areas in race relations and develop methods for educating communities and preventing conflict.

Swank Digital Campus

SWANK offers streaming feature films and documentaries produced by major Hollywood and independent studios. SDSU has access to 500 "core" titles, plus additional titles licensed by faculty request.

Compiled by Gloria Rhodes
Associate Librarian (Outreach)
grhodes@sdsu.edu

For help locating additional items on the Black History Month theme or other research assistants, contact Research Services: phone (619) 594-6728 text (619) 567-9743 or email eref@sdsu.edu

Books: A Selected List

African Americans in Congress: a documentary history

  • By Freedman, Eric (2008)
  • Call Number: SDSU Library, 4th Floor Books, JK1021 .A47 2008

This book presents an in-depth, exciting look at the African American political experience and the history of African American legislators in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

Black faces in the Mirror: African Americans and their representatives in the U.S. Congress

Black faces in the Mirror: African Americans and their representatives in the U.S. Congress

  • By Katherine Tate (2003)
  • Call Number: SDSU Library, 3rd Floor Books, E185.615 .T37 2003

Tate examines the significance of race in the U.S. system of representative democracy for African Americans.

Freedom is not enough: Black voters, Black candidates, and American presidential politics

Freedom is not enough: Black voters, Black candidates, and American presidential politics

  • By Ronald W. Walters (2005)
  • Call Number: SDSU Library, 4th Floor Books, JK1924 .W343 2005

In Freedom Is Not Enough (a quote from Lyndon Johnson's 1965 commencement address to Howard University just before he signed the Voting Rights Act), Ronald W. Walters traces the history of the Black vote since 1965, celebrates its fortieth anniversary in 2005, and shows why passing a law is not the same as ensuring its enforcement, legitimacy, and opportunity."

The Congressional Black Caucus, Minority Voting Rights, and the U.S. Supreme Court

The Congressional Black Caucus, Minority Voting Rights, and the U.S. Supreme Court

She evaluates the competing approaches to racial equality and concludes, surprisingly, that an originalist, race-conscious interpretation of the 14th Amendment, along with a revised states' rights position regarding electoral districting, may better serve minority political interests.

Suffrage reconstructed: gender, race, and voting rights in the Civil War era

Suffrage reconstructed: gender, race, and voting rights in the Civil War era

  • By Laura Free (2015)
  • SDSU Library, 4th Floor Books, JK1896 .F74 2015

By integrating gender analysis and political history, Suffrage Reconstructed offers a new interpretation of the Civil War-era remaking of American democracy, placing African American activists and women's rights advocates at the heart of nineteenth-century American conversations about public policy, civil rights, and the franchise.

Bearing the cross: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference

Bearing the cross: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference

  • By David J. Garrow (2004)
  • Call Number: SDSU Library, 3rd Floor Books, E185.97.K5 G36 2004

Based on more than seven hundred interviews with all of King's surviving associates, as well as with those who opposed him, and enhanced by the author's access to King's papers and tens of thousands of pages of FBI documents, this is a towering portrait of a man's metamorphosis into a legend.

The rise and fall of the Voting Rights Act

The rise and fall of the Voting Rights Act

  • By Charles S. Bullock (2016)
  • Call Number: SDSU Library, 4th Floor Books, KF4891 .B85 2016

Rigorous in its scholarship and thoroughly readable, this book goes beyond history and analysis to provide compelling and much-needed insight into the ways voting rights legislation has shaped the United States.

This Bright Light of Ours: Stories from the Voting Rights Fight

This Bright Light of Ours: Stories from the Voting Rights Fight

A celebration of grassroots heroes, this book details through first-person accounts the contributions of ordinary people who formed the nonviolent army that won the fight for voting rights. Combining memoir and oral history, Maria Gitin fills a vital gap in civil rights history by focusing on the neglected Freedom Summer of 1965 when hundreds of college students joined forces with local black leaders to register thousands of new black voters in the rural South.

Walking with the wind: a memoir of the movement

Walking with the wind: a memoir of the movement

  • By John Lewis (1998)
  • Call Number: SDSU Library, 3rd Floor Books, E840.8.L43 A3 1998

Congressman John Lewis recounts his life, which began in rural poverty in Alabama, and included leadership of the movement to desegregate Nashville, a speech at the 1963 March on Washington, chairmanship of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and election to the U.S. Congress from Georgia in 1986.

When the letter betrays the spirit: voting rights enforcement and African American participation from Lyndon Johnson to Barack Obama

When the letter betrays the spirit: voting rights enforcement and African American participation from LBJ to Obama

The book examines when, why, and how executive and judicial discretion facilitates the violation of voting rights. Connecting Johnson to Obama, the book outlines why the executive-centered model of voting rights.

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Location: Library Addition, 1st Floor
Phone 619.594.6728  Text: 619.567.9743
Email: eref@sdsu.edu

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